Bee in Harmony by Sophia Rowe

Changing comb – Part 4 – Season 6


In Part 2 and Part 3 of Changing Comb series for this Season 6, I told about removing of the old comb (foundation) from the beehive before preparing the colony for the winter. This is a modified by me method (called the Bailey comb change method) described in BeeCraft, July 2016, by Jason Learner from National Bee Unit British organization. The difference…

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For beekeeper’s garden: Tea Shrub


If you are a tea drinker, you may know the difference between the green and the black teas. But have you ever seen the tea shrub, Camellia sinensis? Did you know that it grows easily in zone 7, as an evergreen shrub? Did you know that it blooms in the fall? And how about that it is a bee plant?…

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Changing comb – Part 3 – Season 6


In the last post, I described how I removed the old comb from my four deep double super beehives. I still had three hives in regular supers, which needed to have their old foundation removed. So, in this post, I am going to talk about them. 1. I start with placing a clean bottom board and deep super next to the…

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Old comb - Bee In Harmony

Changing comb – Part 2 – Season 6


The fall is here. It is time to harvest honey. For us, natural beekeepers, it is also time to  change the comb (foundation). Every year, as I harvest my honey, I change from deep double supers to my regular width deep supers, and in the process, I inspect each frame, looking for any dark comb and brood. I either set it aside for…

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Honey comb - Bee in Harmony - a natural beekeeper's blog

Changing comb – Part 1 – Season 6


If I was allowed to talk about only one rule every natural beekeeper should abide by, it would be changing honey comb (foundation) yearly. Yes, it means that the bees will be spending time, energy and food on building new foundation (so, I make them do it in the fall). Yes, you will need to be monitoring the hive for some stubborn…

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Sedum - Autumn Joy - Bee in Harmony - a natural beekeeper's blog

For beekeeper’s garden: Sedum “Autumn Joy”


Sedums – ducks don’t seem to bother them I planted these Sedums (“Autumn Joy”) a few years ago. Every year, early in the spring, I divide the plants, and each August they produce the most amazing blooms. Heat, drought, chicken and ducks trumpeting all over… nothing deters this plant from producing these gorgeous blooms. Blooms and wonderful fragrance are not its only…

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Bee in Harmony - a natural beekeeper's blog

The bee needs her sleep too


Did you know that the bees need their sleep too? In 1983, Walter Kaiser made an interesting discovery: honeybees slept. In 2014, biologists Barrett Klein, Martin Stiegler, Arno Klein, and Jürgen Tautz from the universities of Würzburg and Wisconsin La Crosse (USA) published more research in the journal PLoS ONE. (https://www.uni-wuerzburg.de/en/sonstiges/meldungen/detail/artikel/schlaf-bi/) Some of their findings include that facts that house bees took about…

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Honey - Bee in Harmony - Rowe Apiaries

Adding honey supers – Season 6


We have had very hot and dry months of June and July, so it was a great relief to get some rain in August. I was able to check on two of the four beehives that I had set up for making honey (with double deep supers). Two of them were ready for expansion. Deep double supers are waiting for expansion You…

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Honey - Bee in Harmony

Fast expanding hives – Season 6


In my previous post, I described how I had five colonies, four of which were moved into double-deep-super size beehives for the summer expansion (they are my honey making colonies). I made a split from one of those colonies.   The fifth colony was split as well, with both beehives positioned on the same stand, equal distance away from the…

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Expanding to double deep supers – Season 6


So, this year, I started with 5 colonies in the spring. Due to my family circumstances, I did not have the time to start queen replacement process and, instead, decided to let the bees decide when they need to replace their queens. The queens were old. The colonies were rather large, so I made sure that I removed the bottom tray earlier…

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