Browsing Category : Garden and Pollinators

In the Garden: a lesson learned


Two years ago, when we were planning our large raised-bed garden, I somehow thought that it would be a good idea to use the weed screen between those raised beds…
We spaced the boxes 3 feet apart, laid the screen overlapping under each box and, finally, laid some old hay on the top. In just a few months, the weeds began attacking the boxes and the screen. Mowing the weeds in the vicinity of the raised-bed garden should prevent weeds from getting “planted” in the boxes by wind, but we ignored that obvious fact, too busy with raising our children, goats, chickens, and bees… Finally, after weeding (more…)

For beekeeper’s garden: Beach Rose


Since I came to the US many years ago, I spent countless hours looking for rosehip producing rose plants. Rosehip tea is very popular in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. It was only when I discovered Dave’s garden (http://davesgarden.com) and began looking at each of their highest ranking online nurseries that I came across Forest Farm. So, for several years, I have been ordering from them and have never been disappointed :-).
Rosa rugosa (beach rose) produces the most aromatic flowers. Honeybees and other pollinators really appreciate that it blooms spring through late fall, as long as it is (more…)

For beekeeper’s garden: Wormwood


Common Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium)

Wormwood is a very pleasantly smelling perennial plant. It is great for making a flea powder (using D.E. as a base). I have used it on both animals and birds (chickens). And some may even try it in their deworming powder for goats (be careful, as it may damage liver).

Now, what about bees? Wormwood is used by Eastern European beekeepers in their dusting (for mites). It has properties similar to menthol, and it is told to be effective in helping to fight off those infections that are caused by Gram positive bacteria (AFB).

But, also… In my own trials, (more…)

Plants for bees

Planting season


Plants for bees

I saw large tractors with tillers driving on our country roads the other day: the planting season is almost here…
We have vegetable and herb gardens and multiple beds with dwarf fruit trees, shrubs and flowers. For our family, besides, of course, money, food allergies and time constraints, there is also an issue of choosing decorative plants safe around children…

I would like to share my two online advisory sources for choosing honey bee plants:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_nectar_sources_for_honey_bees
http://www.wildflower.org/collections/

My favorite seed source is (more…)